© 2013 MONROE LAKESIDE FIRE AND RESCUE COMPANY, INC.   /   PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY AT WREN PHOTOGRAPHY   /   ONLINE SERVICES POLICY

 

WHY VOLUNTEER? 

Many people ask themselves, "Why should I volunteer for the local fire department? What's in it for me?"

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs)

DOWNLOAD AND PRINT A MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

The first step to becoming a member of Lakeside Fire and Rescue is to download and print a membership application! You can return the application by mail, or you can drop it off at the firehouse any Monday at 7PM. (Currently, we are unable to accept applications electronically.)

 

(Note: to view or print the membership application, you'll need to have Adobe Reader installed.)

APPLY NOW

The answer, of course, is: "A lot."

 

Volunteer firefighters protect our community in more ways than one. Volunteer firefighters obviously help to extinguish and prevent fires and other emergencies, but they also strengthen our community by providing a source of civic pride and by tying residents together in ways that wouldn't otherwise be possible.

 

And volunteer firefighters help keep property taxes lower, too. Paid firefighters are effective, of course, but their costs are added directly to tax bills. Volunteer firefighters keep property tax bills down - which is great for residents, businesses, and our community's growth.

 

When you consider the benefits to both you and our community, we think you'll find volunteer firefighting to be worthwhile indeed. Download your application now.

 

 

HOW MUCH TIME DOES IT TAKE TO BE A VOLUNTEER?

It varies from week to week, but on average, about seven or eight hours per week. Many members enjoy putting in more time, or spending additional time whenever their schedule permits (school vacation, after work, etc).

 

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF MEMBERSHIP?

Lakeside has different membership types. Whichever option you select, we've got plenty of work for you to do!

 

Interior firefighters perform all of the tasks associated with firefighting, including entering burning structures to aggressively fight fires.  Many interior firefighters enjoy the personal discpline, self-determination, and physical exertion necessary for interior fire suppression.

 

Exterior firefighters don't enter burning buildings, but they perform many other important tasks at the scene. For example, exterior firefighters will connect hydrants and assemble hoses, extend ladders and use rescue equipment, perform fire suppression at brush and garbage fires, and do other important tasks.

 

Chauffeurs (drivers) drive the fire trucks and other vehicles. It's an important task - the trucks can't get there if nobody's driving! In addition to driving, chauffeurs operate the water pumps and equipment on the vehicle at the fire scene, and perform basic maintenance of the vehicle and its equipment.